Archive for the ‘Drug Tests’ Category

Workplace Alcohol Testing

team-spirit-959269_1280An employee who comes to work under the influence of drugs or alcohol will, at the very least, have diminished productivity and poor work performance; at worst, that person poses a serious safety risk to themselves and those around them. As an employer, you have both the right and the obligation to maintain a safe work environment for fellow employees, which is why insisting on a drug- and alcohol-free workplace is necessary.

A urine alcohol rapid test, as well as a saliva alcohol test, are both reliable ways for employers to immediately determine if alcohol is present in the blood. Whether you suspect an employee to be under the influence, or you administer random drug and alcohol screenings to your employees, you can trust the results from our urine alcohol rapid test kits.

The urine alcohol test kit is intended for the screening of ethyl alcohol in human urine. MP Rapid Alcohol Test is designed as the screen tool to rapidly determine if the BAC level is higher than 0.04% (the cutoff level at which an individual is considered positive for the presence of alcohol) by testing the urine specimen. The distinct color on reactive pad could be observed in less than 4 minutes after the tip was contacted with urine samples with the ethyl alcohol concentration greater than 0.04%.

While follow-up tests are nearly always necessary in order to confirm the initial results, urine tests, such as the options from Diagnostic Automation / Cortez Diagnostics, Inc., can provide immediate data.

What to Drug Test For?

no-drugs-156771_1280Employers who decide to drug test job applicants and/or employees must also decide which drugs they will test for. The basic 6 panel drug test consists of six drugs consistent with the U.S. Department of Transportation requirements. These six substances include THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana), cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, PCP (phencyclidine), and Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine).

Many employers today go beyond testing for these six drugs, expanding the panel of drugs for which job applicants’ and employees’ are tested. The panel sometimes is expanded to include as many drugs as the employer sees fit, and may include barbiturates, benzodiazepines, methadone, methaqualone, propoxyphene, and methamphetamines. Many employers also test for what is still the most common drug of abuse in America – although a legal one – alcohol.

No business is immune to the problems of workplace drug and alcohol abuse, with workplace drug abuse costing companies millions of dollars every year. It’s your right to protect your company and your responsibility to keep your employees safe in the workplace. With the high number of accidents and workplace injuries that occur as a result of drug and alcohol abuse, it’s a good idea to implement and enforce a strict, 100% substance-abuse free environment.

Creating a Substance-Free Workplace

drugs-1276787_1280Whether an employee or potential employee’s substance abuse occurs at home or at work, employees who abuse alcohol and drugs (including illegal drugs, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs) can create significant issues for both employers and other employees. Employees who abuse drugs have been shown to have higher absenteeism, are less productive, have higher medical costs, and have more accidents and injuries. The cost of drug abuse to employers has been estimated to be as high as $100 billion a year.

In order to address and circumvent these issues, drug testing has become the norm for many companies. Step one in implementing a substance-free workplace is to have a policy against drug and alcohol abuse. Every employer can and should have such a policy. While it’s best to tailor your policy to fit your businesses circumstances, a model policy can serve as an excellent starting point and some common principles and language to use.

Because drug use can affect employees’ health and productivity, it’s important for businesses to periodically review their drug-testing policies. By implementing workplace drug-testing policies, an employer may be able to help prevent drug use before it starts, identify employees who need drug treatment, and reduce work-related accidents due to illegal drug use.

In our next blog post, we’ll discuss the substances most commonly tested using the 6 panel drug test kit, as well as the 8 panel drug test kit. Read on to learn more about those substances and implementing a drug-free policy in your workplace.

Weighing the Pros and Cons of Workplace Drug Testing

alcohol-428392_1280Today, in some industries, random drug testing is just an everyday part of the job. The subject of drug testing in the workplace is a controversial one. Some business owners feel they have every right to randomly test employees for illicit drug use, while others think it unnecessary if they hire the right staff in the first place. However, with more states coming closer to legalizing marijuana, drug testing in the workplace has become an increasingly hot topic.

Pros of Workplace Drug Testing
Workers who abuse drugs pose a safety risk in the workplace. Businesses often face a higher exposure to liability due to drug-related work accidents. According to the United States Department of Labor, 10 to 20 percent of U.S. workers involved in fatal on-the-job accidents tested positive for illicit drugs and alcohol.

Random drug screening does make for a powerful deterrent. Drug testing makes the stakes of drug use even higher. Thus employees will be less inclined to use drugs if they know it could threaten their employment.

Cons of Workplace Drug Testing
Random workplace drug testing can lead to resentment among employees who it violates their right to privacy. Workers against drug testing in the workplace often threaten to sue their employer for violations.

What’s your stance on workplace drug testing? If you feel like the cost and potential inconvenience of implementing a drug-free workplace far outweigh the benefit of knowing your employees are coming to work clean, sober and ready to do their job and want to get started, drug test kits are simple, fast and easy to use.

Benefits of Drug and Alcohol Testing at Work

man-162604_640The ramifications for both an employer and an employee who comes to work impaired from drugs or alcohol, or an employee who is actually using while on the job, is major. Drug and alcohol abuse affects job performance, absenteeism, tardiness, employee theft and behavioral problems.

Running a drug- and alcohol-free workplace is a smart decision in regards to your company’s liability, but it also helps eliminates work-place interference’s, not to mention improving safety.

Employees want a working environment that is safe. Substance abuse contributes to an extremely unsafe working environment. Alcohol and drugs are responsible for one in six on-the-job fatalities. The National Safety Council reported that 80 percent of those injured in “serious” drug-related accidents at work are not the drug abusing employees, but innocent coworkers and others.

Alcohol and drug testing ensures the hiring of more effective workers and a safer and more productive workplace – the kind of environment in which people want to work.

Unsure how to run a drug-free workplace? It’s actually quite simple using Alcohol Rapid testing kit. The test strips allow you to perform on-site random alcohol screening, with results in as little as two minutes. Visit rapidtest.com today to learn more.

What is Hematology?

Hematology is the field of medicine involved in the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. It is a branch of internal medicine that deals with the physiology, pathology, etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of blood-related disorders. Hematologists also focus on lymphatic organs and bone marrow and may diagnose blood count irregularities or platelet irregularities. They are able to treat organs that are fed by blood cells, including the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus and lymphoid tissue.

microscope-772297_1280Hematology and oncology overlap in cancer treatment. Hematology-oncology doctors prescribe and perform stem cell transplants, bone marrow transplants and chemotherapy. These therapies are used to treat lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and immunity diseases.

When something is wrong with your blood, it can affect your total health. Common blood disorders include anemia, bleeding disorders such as hemophilia, blood clots, and blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma.

If you believe you may have a blood condition, talking to your doctor is the first step. After testing, including Hematology test kits,your doctor can refer you to a hematologist.

What are Tumor Markers?

Tumor markers are substances that can be produced by cancer cells or by the body in response to cancer. They can contain normal cells, but are generated at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. Most tumor markers are proteins and can be found in bodily fluids such as blood and urine.blood-75302_640

Tumor markers can be used to detect or follow cancer. When a decrease in the level of a tumor marker is detected, it can be a sign that the tumor is decreasing in size and treatment is working. Alternatively, an increase could mean the cancer is progressing. (Although an elevated level of a tumor marker may suggest the presence of cancer, changes in these levels are not enough to detect cancer on their own. This is why a tumor marker test is used in conjunction with other tests for a final diagnosis.)

In addition to proteins, tumor markers can also be constituted as changes in DNA or RNA. This is because such changes have been associated with certain cancers and can also be used to help monitor them. Some tumor markers have been found to be less specific than others, but with continuous research, overall effectiveness is increasing. More than 20 different tumor markers have been identified and are currently in use, and newer types of tests have been developed to examine several tumor markers at a time.

Implementing a Drug-Free Workplace | Drug test kits

Are you a business owner and considering implementing a drug-free workplace? The decision to enforce a drug-free environment and institute drug testing is an important one, but we also know you don’t come to that decision lightly. There are a lot of logistics and legal matters involved, but while those might seem like negatives initially, the positives of a drug-free staff are innumerable.

Workplace drug testing lets employers ensure their employees are not using illegal drugs on the job or during their time off. While it may cost money upfront to test your employees, the advantage of testing makes it worth the cost.

Ensure Employees Safety – Some jobs are dangerous. Using heavy equipment or driving a truck requires an employee to be completely alert. Drug testing before your employee starts their shift will ensure that they aren’t working while under the influence, protecting them and other staff from potential accidents.

Avoiding Problems Down the Road – Screening potential hires allows you to be sure they are clean and sober before you officially hire them. Once hired, regular screening allows you to ensure that a drug problem doesn’t quickly spiral out of control – costing you time, money and manpower.

The cost and potential inconvenience of implementing a drug-free workplace are far outweighed by the benefit of knowing your employees are coming to work clean, sober and ready to do their job. Drug test kits are simple, fast and easy to use. Get started today!

Drug Testing Kits and Your Better, Drug-Free Workplace

Alcohol Testing | RapidTest.comEmployers who are hesitant about testing their employees for drug use do not need to be. When you are faced with the decision, it may seem unnecessary or even awkward. Remember, seven out of ten drug abusers are employed.

Being drug-free saves. By testing, most companies enjoy a 5% discount on their worker’s compensation premiums. These savings are further reflected by reduced usage of healthcare benefits. In addition, a reduction in revenues lost due to workers calling out.

Being drug-free improves safety. Drug abusers are far more likely to be involved in a workplace accident. In fact, studies show that more than 50% of all workplace accidents stem from drug abuse (including alcohol).

Being drug-free makes cent. All joking aside, employees who do not use and abuse drugs produce more, better work. This translates into increased profitability for your company. It also makes everyone feel better about who they choose to work with.

In most cases, the benefits to running a drug-free workplace far outweigh the inconvenience of testing. Moreover, the perceived inconvenience of testing is far less than you might think. Drug testing kits are simple to use, easy to access, and available on our website.

 

All you need to know about EBOLA

Risk of Exposure and History

Ebola viruses are found in several African countries. Ebola was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since then, outbreaks of Ebola among humans have appeared sporadically in Africa.

Risk

Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients. People also can become sick with Ebola after coming in contact with infected wildlife. For example, in Africa, Ebola may spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. The virus also can be spread through contact with objects (like clothes, bedding, needles, syringes/sharps or medical equipment) that have been contaminated with the virus or with infected animals.

Past Ebola Outbreaks

Past Ebola outbreaks have occurred in the following countries:

  • Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
  • Gabon
  • South Sudan
  • Ivory Coast
  • Uganda
  • Republic of the Congo (ROC)
  • South Africa (imported)

Current Ebola Outbreak in West Africa

The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history and is affecting multiple countries in West Africa. One imported case from Liberia and associated locally acquired cases in healthcare workers have been reported in the United States, and one confirmed case has been reported in Spain.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms of Ebola include

  • Fever
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing Ebola in an person who has been infected for only a few days is difficult, because the early symptoms, such as fever, are nonspecific to Ebola infection and are seen often in patients with more commonly occurring diseases, such as malaria and typhoid fever.

However, if a person has the early symptoms of Ebola and has had contact with the blood or body fluids of a person sick with Ebola, contact with objects that have been contaminated with the blood or body fluids of a person sick with Ebola, or contact with infected animals, they should be isolated and public health professionals notified. Samples from the patient can then be collected and tested to confirm infection.

Transmission

Because the natural reservoir host of Ebola viruses has not yet been identified, the way in which the virus first appears in a human at the start of an outbreak is unknown. However, scientists believe that the first patient becomes infected through contact with an infected animal, such as a fruit bat or primate (apes and monkeys), which is called a spillover event. Person-to-person transmission follows and can lead to large numbers of affected people. In some past Ebola outbreaks, primates were also affected by Ebola, and multiple spillover events occurred when people touched or ate infected primates.

When an infection does occur in humans, the virus can be spread in several ways to others. Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected fruit bats or primates (apes and monkeys)

Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. There is no evidence that mosquitos or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only a few species of mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus.

Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids of sick patients.

During outbreaks of Ebola, the disease can spread quickly within healthcare settings (such as a clinic or hospital). Exposure to Ebola can occur in healthcare settings where hospital staff are not wearing appropriate protective equipment, including masks, gowns, and gloves and eye protection.

Dedicated medical equipment (preferable disposable, when possible) should be used by healthcare personnel providing patient care. Proper cleaning and disposal of instruments, such as needles and syringes, is also important. If instruments are not disposable, they must be sterilized before being used again. Without adequate sterilization of the instruments, virus transmission can continue and amplify an outbreak.