Archive for the ‘Hepatitis’ Category

Myth Busters: Hepatitis C

As we disgusted in the previous post, hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes damage to the liver over time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2.7 million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis C. A chronic infection, it can lead to serious scarring of the liver called cirrhosis, as well as liver cancer and liver failure.

Myth busters: Hepatitis C
Myth: There is no cure for hepatitis C.
Fact: Not only can patients with hepatitis C be treated, they can also be cured. “Cured” means that the hepatitis C virus is not detectable in your blood months after treatment has ended. Relapse or reinfection is still possible and a person can still have liver disease even after being cured.

Myth: You can get hepatitis C from sharing eating utensils.
Fact: Hepatitis C is passed from person to person when an uninfected person’s blood comes in contact with infected blood. Hepatitis C isn’t spread by sharing eating utensils, food or drinks, or from shaking or holding hands with someone who’s infected.

Myth: There is no way to reduce the risk of getting hepatitis C .
Fact: There are ways to lessen your risk of getting the hepatitis C virus. Some of these include:
Avoid sharing needles and injecting or snorting drugs.
Don’t share razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers, or other personal care items that may have come into contact with infected blood.
Don’t use tattoo or piercing equipment that’s been used on someone else.

If you’re an international organization or doctor’s office looking for dependable and reliable HCV rapid test, Rapid Test has the binding assays needed for proper detection. For export outside of the United States, contact us today with questions.

What is Hepatitis C?

doctor-563428_1280Hepatitis C is a disease caused by a virus that infects the liver. Over time, it can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. It is spread by contact with an infected person’s blood.

Often times a person doesn’t know that they have hepatitis C until they already have some level of liver damage. This can take many years. Some people who get hepatitis C have it for a short time and then get better. This is called acute hepatitis C. But most people who are infected with the virus go on to develop long-term, or chronic, hepatitis C. Although hepatitis C can be very serious, most people can manage the disease and lead active, full lives.

Contracting the virus
You can get hepatitis C the following ways:
*By sharing needles and other equipment used to inject illegal drugs. This is the most common way to get hepatitis C in the United States.
*You had a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992. As of 1992 in the United States, all donated blood and organs are screened for hepatitis C.
*You get a shot with a needle that has infected blood on it. This happens in some developing countries where they use needles more than once when giving shots.
*You get a tattoo or a piercing with a needle that has infected blood on it. This can happen if equipment isn’t cleaned properly after it is used.

Are you an international organization or doctor’s office looking for dependable and reliable hepatitis panel rapid test? For export outside of the United States, Rapid Test has the binding assays needed for proper detection. Contact us today with questions.